Support for Feet Forward enthusiasts everywhere

GRP - The Kit

From left to right;

Digital scales, the Sicomin Epoxy SR5550 resin mixes at 100grams to 29 grams, scales work to +- 1 gram, not good enough for cocaine but fine for resin. Scales live in a plastic bag to avoid resin contamination.

Release wax. Ensures clean release from table, or anything else you don't want the resin to stick to.

1 kilo pack of Sicomin SR5550 and the 5505 hardener. Goes off at 25 degrees C to touch dry in an hour.

Pair of good kitchen scissors to cut the cloth before and after curing. Double layers need sheet metal shears.

GRP -  The Kit

GRP, extra features

Some mountings are best done by right angled sections and these can be easily made using a right handled panel on the layup table. Table is ordinary 'melemine' worktop surface. These release very well, but an application of release wax also helps once they get a bit scratched. A corner radius was achieved using a strip of masking tape, this removes fairly easily after curing.

GRP, extra features

GRP. And then...2

This includes any flat sections located by simple bolt holes like these side panel mounts (above the silencer) The line and arrow on this panel shows the maximum width of the bodywork, it's essential to establish symmetry at this stage.

GRP. And then...2

GRP, And then...

Then the individual fasteners can be cut out of the sheet and bolted to the locations on the bike already prepared

GRP, And then...

first steps, continued

A cone cutter and a tap will clean out the mounting holes (M8)

first steps, continued

making GRP bodywork, first steps

It saves a lot of time to bond all the 'Big Head' fasteners into some sheet in one go

making GRP bodywork, first steps

cmax two up, front side view

This is my second Cmax conversion on roll-out from workshop to bodyshop. The gold-coloured 'Big head' bonding fasteners can be seen in various places, ready for the first pieces of bodywork to be bonded on.

cmax two up, front side view

cmax two up side view

cmax two up side view

Cmax.

Cmax.

Cmax. June 2009 first assembly pre-bodywork

Cmax.  June 2009 first assembly pre-bodywork

MP3: On Board Lane-Splitting

Lane splitting is no problem on the MP3 TTW. Photo of Blez driving shot from the pillion seat by Bernard Zieja. 2007

MP3: On Board Lane-Splitting

MP3 lane-splitting

The front wheels of Piaggio's MP3 are only 420mm (16.5inches) apart, so lane-splitting like a conventional bike or scooter is no problem. Pic of Blez in West London by Bernard Zieja, 2007.

MP3 lane-splitting

Piaggio MP3 drifting

You'd have to be fairly bold to put a heavy two wheeled scooter into a full bore drift like this. On the MP3, it seems less bold.
Pic of Blez by Bernard Zieja, 2007

Piaggio MP3 drifting

Piaggio MP3 250

Piaggio's MP3 tilting Three Wheeler is not an FF, but there has been quite a lot of discussion about it on the FF discussion list, so I thought we should have a few pix up on bikeweb for people to refer to. There's no doubt that the twin front wheels provide a reassuring feeling of grip and confidence on slippery surfaces and it can be heeled over to a respectable 'angle of dangle' before things start grounding. Picture of Blez at Shepherd's Bush roundabout, London, by Bernard Zieja.

Piaggio MP3 250

Narrowed

Inspired by Philip Wakeham's 'Anything is possible' attitude to engineering art I woke up one morning and decided to implement Royce Creasey's aerodynamic improvement hints (see his technical paper on this site) and cut the fairing into three pieces, chopped four inches out of the middle, and reassembled it!
The narrower fairing has little impact on comfort, reduces frontal area a little, but amazingly has made the bike much less susceptible to side winds and the turbulent air behind large lorries, it is more 'indifferent' as Royce puts it.

Narrowed
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A scan of the original Quasar Brochure (signed too!)

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